Donut Fear~Classic Novels+Review of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Don-ut Fear

I was so excited to finish my copy of Jane Eyre Last night!

I’ve been reading this book since Valentines day, and I FINALLY finished it.  Which is happy because 1)I get to post about it, 2)I get to review it

But also sad, because my experience with it is OVER.

Image result for over gif

@

I was thinking about a post idea with my Mom this morning*, and she suggested that I review Jane Eyre, since I finished it…

 

But I realized…I WAS AFRAID

Some things I was afraid of:

  • It would be hard
  • Nobody would want to read it
  • It would take a long time
  • NOT MANY PEOPLE MY AGE READ THIS STUFF
*Mother Daughter goals

And then, I thought, “THIS IS HORRIBLE.  I cannot be afraid of such things, I am a gallant bookish knight, I WILL review this!”

Image result for i accept the challenge gif

@

Donut fear these little classics!

Untitled design (10)

1.  They have the prettiest darn dang it covers I’ve ever seen in my life

@

My grandma bought me sets  of the classic Penguin novels, and they ARE MY PRIDE AND JOY!

Jane Eyre

JUST LOOK AT IT!  It has the leafy things, the title is the same size as the Author’s name**, AHH!

Related image

via

*What?!  Are you judging me??

Untitled design (10)

2.  They are not JUST BOOKS, they are an experience!

Well, I suppose no books are just BOOKS.

But these things are an experience.  Due to the old English prose, they require your attention and concentration, which I think allows for better comprehension, believe it or not.  They have indexes in the back to look back to, in case you don’t understand some of the terms that would be used in the 1890’s.

They are super long!  Jane Eyre was 520 pages.  That isn’t much for a modern book, but for a classic book with many phrases that you need to think about, similes you need to decipher, and large pieces of vocabulary***, It just takes longer.

But all those things that I mentioned above are fun!  Classics are like puzzles, each sentence MEANS something, the author really had a purpose for putting it there.  

***Keep a dictionary near by

Untitled design (10)

3.  They almost all have movie adaptions you can make fun of!

We book worms are bullies to movie adaptions.

Related image

@

I can’t wait to watch the movie to Jane Eyre, and I’m hoping to be able to make fun of it.

MAYBE it’ll be a good movie adaption to a good book.  

Untitled design (10)

4.  It’ll make you want to be a pretty English Lady in the 19th century

I’ll expand on this in my review, but WOULDN’T IT BE SO COOL TO BE JANE EYRE??
I mean, I’d get to wear pretty dresses, teach a little girl, live in a huge house for free, and I’d also get to have TWO men propose to me!

Image result for living the life gif

@

Now that you know that Classics are not rude little onions, but kind little watermelons, I’ll review one for you all now!

Redhead’s Review~Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte

Untitled design (10)

Jane is innocent, she is sure.  But somehow, under the roof of her aunt, Ms.Reed, no matter how perfect she acts, she is always guilty of something.  Her father and mother have died, and her cousin, John Reed, expresses a deep hatred of her through abuse.  Ms.Reed soon tires of Jane and her unpleasant appearance, and sends her off to the strict and foreboding boarding school for girls, Lowood.  As she grows up, she is faced with many hardships.  When it’s finally time to get her life together, she applies for a job as a governess.  Thornfield hall, owned by Mr.Rochester, houses a ward named Adele whom Jane is paid to teach.  Slowly but surely, Jane and the strange Mr.Rochester fall in love.  But what other obstacles will Jane have to face to be happy?

I was excited to get a taste of a biography,(inferred by the title), and I dove right into this the moment I received it, and was HOOKED!

First, we must talk about the glory that is Jane Eyre.

She is ugly, faithful to God, modest, kind, sweet, generous, stubborn, A BOOKWORM, and basically just a perfect character that is completely nice and loveable and cuddly!

The childhood sadness set up was great.

It really made the reader pity Jane, and all the hard times she had made us LOVE HER even more!

Jane Eyre is organized in 38 chapters, 521 pages, an introduction, and an index for better reader engagement.  It is written in 1st person.  The intended audience is most likely for lovers of English classics.  

The whole theme was amazing

The them of the whole entire novel was to be faithful always to the Lord, no matter what YOU want.  Which is basically the theme of Christian Life.

The ending was oh-so satisfying

Everything was so happy!  Her heart was clean, and she made the right decision.  The concluding chapter also documents ten years after the book “ends”,which I LOVE, because nothing is left hanging.

The index was SO helpful

I loved how everything was so neat and organized, you got a ribbon bookmark, and the index dated back to the origin of the phrase, and gave you some extra KNOWLEDGE.  Which is awesome, because since Jane is a teacher, it makes you feel even more like Jane.

Untitled design (10)

The Love triangle sometimes tended to drone on and on, AND ON.  

We get it Jane, you think God doesn’t want you to end up with Mr.Rochester, but you love him.  And St.John likes you too, WE UNDERSTAND.  

Jane made some unnecessary decisions.  

There was a point in the book where for 4 straight chapter, Jane was just running around from town to town, begging for food, and feeling sorry for herself.  I though that part was quite long, and contradicted Jane’s string personality that we all know and love.

Untitled design (10)

Did you like the book?

I loved the book!  I loved how long it was, and I was very happy that this was my first classic.

What was your favorite part of the book?

My favorite part was the beginning, because everything was short and sweet, yet gave you the perfect amount of information to know what was going on.

Do you have a least favorite part of the book?

There was an unnecessary character, Mrs.  Fairfax.

Jane talks about Thornfield’s maid, Mrs.Fairfax about 55 times, and they are not generally close to one another,  She is just kind of there.  Sure, she’s very nice to Jane, but she certainly isn’t nice enough to be noted so many times in the story.

If you could change something, what would it be?

I think I would take out Mrs.Fairfax, and also make the whole love triangle part a lot shorter.

I loved this book! 

Untitled design (10)

Do you like classics?  Have you read any? Have you read Jane Eyre?  Talk to me in the comments!

transparent

PS,

We have a giveaway for 120 follows coming up!

Advertisements

23 thoughts on “Donut Fear~Classic Novels+Review of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

  1. I’ve seen a play version of Jane Eyre, and I think it did a good job of taking out all the parts you said you didn’t like! Of course, plays don’t compare to reading actual books, but I think it was a great adaptation, and if you ever get a chance to see it, I’d totally recommend it.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is a great review!!! Let’s see…the last time I read Jane Eyre was fifty seven years ago!!! You have made me want to go back and read it again, along with lots of the other classics!
    Great job, love, grandma

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Oh my gosh-I LOVE classics! In addition to ones like A Little Princess, Little Women, etc. I’ve read several books by Charles Dickens, William Shakespeare, and Jane Austen. I’ve never read Jane Eyre, but I wonder if I would like it.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. *runs off to read Jane Eyre*

    The blossom comes before the fruit,
    the bud before the rose.
    The seed is planted in the ground
    before the flower grows.

    God sets these things in order
    with precision we can’t borrow
    And hangs the stars that we might know
    the promise of tomorrow.

    ~The Promise Of Tomorrow, by Clay Harrison
    Happy Poem In Your Pocket Day, Sammy!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s